Columbia study on race and dating

First, let’s keep this in perspective, here are the correlations from the GSS for married individuals for several variables of note (I’ve filtered for whites here): Ethnicity – 0.40 Highest Degree – 0.55 Socioeconomic index – 0.32 I think it’s interesting to note that the variable which reveals meritocratic achievement has the highest correlation.

Ethnicity is something you’re born into, and socioeconomic index is a metric which derives from the milieu in which you were raised.

I hadn’t been on Tinder for long before I realized something was wrong: Hardly anyone was reciprocating my interest. None of my close friends, many of whom relied exclusively on the dating app to meet singles, seemed to be encountering this problem. Was there a grammatical error in my personal statement? What they found was that users placed a premium on members of their own race.

In 2009, Ok Trends, the research arm of the dating website Ok Cupid, parsed user data to determine racial preferences in online dating.

One social science finding which I’ve wondered about over the past few years is the result that women care much more about the race of a potential mate than men do.

The fact that individuals tend to want to mate assortatively with those who share their characteristics is no surprise.

The only groups not to be categorically discriminated against were white men and Asian women.

So, while users exercised greater discretion in their stated preference, in practice their actions remained the same..

We employ a Speed Dating experiment that allows us to directly observe individual decisions and thus infer whose preferences lead to racial segregation in romantic relationships.

Females exhibit stronger racial preferences than males.

My dalliance with Tinder lasted for four weeks before I boarded up the account and returned to the world of low-tech, meat-and-potatoes courtship.

This was especially true of white users and women users.